The Lord’s Prayer (Part 2)

Verse: Matthew 6:10

A) English Translations

KJV: Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. NASB: ‘Your kingdom come. Your will be done, On earth as it is in heaven. NLT: May your Kingdom come soon. May your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.

B) Greek

ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου·
γενηθήτω τὸ θέλημά σου,
ὡς ἐν οὐρανῷ καὶ ἐπὶ γῆς·

Source: https://www.nestle-aland.com/en/read-na28-online/text/bibeltext/lesen/stelle/50/60001/69999/

Source: https://biblehub.com/interlinear/matthew/6-10.htm

C) Observations

Your kingdom come

St. Jerome

    • “He is either asking for the kingdom of the entire world in a general sense, that the devil would cease to reign in the world, or he is asking that God would reign in each one, and that sin would not reign in man’s mortal body.”[1]

 

R.T. France

    • Thy kingdom come is the most clearly eschatological clause in the prayer. It must at least include an aspiration for the final establishment of God’s rule over all his creation … But in the ministry of Jesus the kingdom of God had in a sense already come (see on 3:2) and its progressive establishment no less than its final consummation should be the constant concern of disciples.”[2]

 

Robert H. Mounce

    • “Although the kingdom came in the life and ministry of Jesus, it awaits the second advent to be complete and final (cf. 1 Cor. 15:28). We live now in those days between the beginning of the age to come and the end of the age that is present, God’s sovereign rule is realised in the hearts of his followers, but it will one day be openly acknowledged (cf. Phil. 2:10-11).”[3]

 

Craig Evans

    • “The second petition speaks to the burden of Jesus’ proclamation: “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel” (Mark 1:15). Although the kingdom of God is at hand, Jesus still petitions God that His kingdom come. From this we rightly infer that the kingdom of God made its appearance in the ministry of Jesus, but has not yet arrived in its fullness. Jesus urges his disciples to pray to God that the kingdom arrive in its fullness soon, or in the words of the Qaddish, “speedily and soon.””[4]

 

Your will be done

R.T. France

    • “Similarly, Thy will be done can apply both to men’s obedience to God’s will in the world today (cf. the very personal use of the same phrase by Jesus in 26:42) and to the ultimate working out of God’s purpose for the world.”[5]

 

On earth as it is in heaven

R.T. France

    • “… the phrase on earth as it is in heaven, which, in view of the careful balance of the three preceding clauses, is probably to be taken with all of them rather than as an extension of the last. It too allows the double application of these clauses which have a fulfilment not only in the worship and harmony of heaven but also on earth progressively as the consummation approaches and completely when it comes.”[6]

 

Robert H. Mounce

    • “The heart of the prayer is that God’s will may be done here on earth as well as in heaven (v.10). When the two clauses of verse 10 are taken as parallel, we learn that God’s kingdom comes whenever his will is done. Perfect obedience to his will awaits the final arrival of the King. In the meantime, those who follow Christ can experience his sovereign rule by living lives of obedience. Some writers take the final clause (on earth as it is in heaven) as qualifying all three of the preceding petitions.”[7]

 

Craig Evans

    • “The third petition closely relates to the second. When the kingdom of [God] has come in its fullness, then God’s will shall be the rule of law on earth, just as surely as it is in heaven now. It must be remembered that “kingdom of God” (or “kingdom of heaven,” as the Matthean evangelist prefers) refers to God’s reign or sphere of rule. He rules in heaven (as Jesus’ vision of Satan’s fall from heaven surely implies; cf. Luke 10:18), but his rule on earth is rejected and opposed. Thus God’s will is yet to be accomplished as far as the human sphere is concerned.”[8]

 

[1] Commentary on Matthew (CUA Press, 2008), p.87

[2] The Gospel According to Matthew: An Introduction and Commentary (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1985), p.134

[3] Matthew (Understanding the Bible Commentary Series) [Baker Books, 2011]

[4] The Bible Knowledge Background Commentary: Matthew-Luke, Volume 1 (David C Cook, 2003), p.124

[5] The Gospel According to Matthew: An Introduction and Commentary (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1985), p.134

[6] The Gospel According to Matthew: An Introduction and Commentary (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1985), p.135

[7] Matthew (Understanding the Bible Commentary Series) [Baker Books, 2011]

[8] The Bible Knowledge Background Commentary: Matthew-Luke, Volume 1 (David C Cook, 2003), p.124

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